Researchers use graphene to improve polymeric coatings

Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles increase Protective Properties of Epoxy-based Anticorrosive Coating

TEHRAN, Aug. 02 (MNA) – Iranian researchers from Institute for Color Science and Technology improved the anticorrosive properties of polymeric coatings by using graphene and creating nanocomposite structures.

Annually, countries spend a large amount of money on corrosion prevention and repairing the damages due to corrosion. Anticorrosive coatings are used to prevent and reduce the above mentioned costs. Organic coatings are widely used to protect metals against corrosion. Epoxy coatings have desirable protective properties in corrosive media due to its unique characteristics. However, the coating is not able to conserve its protective ability for a long time in contact with corrosive media. According to Iran Nanotechnology Initiative Council (INIC), graphene oxide nanoparticles have been used in this research to create nanocomposite structure and increase protective properties of epoxy-based anticorrosive coating.

The use of synthetic nanocomposite coatings for the coating of onshore devices and equipment and in petrochemical units reduces expenses due to the corrosion, and increases the life of equipment, including pipelines.

Graphene oxide-based nanoparticles have recently attracted the attention of researchers due to their unique properties. However, these materials are not compatible or stable in the majority of organic solvents. Therefore, surface modification process should be carried out on these materials by using amine compounds. The nanosheets are able to prevent the diffusion of corrosive agents into the coating or to postpone the diffusion for a while due to their very high specific area. Therefore, the life of the coating increases significantly.

Results of the research have been published in Corrosion Science, vol. 103, 2016, pp. 283-304.

BAC Mono is first to use 'revolutionary' graphene material

Graphene-enhanced Carbonfibre Used in British Sports Car

The BAC Mono has claimed a world first by making use of a revolutionary new substance called graphene.

The model’s British maker has trialled the new lightweight material in the rear arches of its single seater Mono supercar and says it has the potential to offer serious performance and cost benefits for customers.

Graphene is made from sheets of carbon just one atom thick. It’s lighter and stronger than carbonfibre, which BAC says could mean weight reductions of 20% – a figure that could have significant impacts on performance, fuel economy and cost.

BAC has worked with Haydale Composite Solutions on the trial, which used graphene-enhanced carbonfibre, and decided to focus on the rear arches because of their size and complexity, which allowed the material and manufacturing process to be thoroughly tested. The car was showcased at the Science in the City festival in Manchester.